Fugitive from Justice Charged with Kidnapping Likely in Somalia

“I don’t want her remembered as the woman in the suitcase that was just thrown away.”

(Megan Bailey)

 

The other day I said I would post a few stories that have gone “down the memory hole” mostly because they don’t fit the media narrative when it comes to ‘new Americans.’

Do you remember this story from last summer when a former Tyson Foods meat plant worker, a Somali by the name of Mahamud Tooxoow Mahamed, was found to have kidnapped three little girls after their mother went missing?

Mahamud Tooxoow Mahamed, 37, a Somali national most likely skipped the country.

 

I found only one story that was posted after the initial flurry of news about the discovery of Jessica McCormack’s body which had been crammed into a suitcase and flung into a ravine.

Mahamed is still a fugitive from justice.

If you read the whole long sad tale published in local media (it is over 2,400 words long), you will see that Jessica got mixed up with some scum who brought her life to an untimely end.

I’m posting the story, not so you can tsk! tsk! over her mixed up life, but because it goes against the narrative the politically correct want you to believe about refugees and other immigrants as supposedly salt-of-the-earth people just looking for a better life.

It is the kind of story that should be told as a warning to other young naive women, but it won’t be told in any big way because it depicts an African, a Muslim, as, frankly, a vile man that got through our supposed screening process coming in, and then got out of the country apparently just as easily.

From McDonald County Press  (never at NYT, the Washington Post, CNN, MSNBC etc.):

Friends Seek Justice For Jessica

Jessica McCormack’s murder doesn’t make any sense. The 25-year-old’s partially-clothed body was discovered in a suitcase near Noel in late July. She was identified through dental records. Since her murder three months ago, her friends continue to search for answers.

Jessica was 25 years old at the time she was murdered.

McCormack was a beautiful soul who brought people together, friends say. Life wasn’t easy for her, but she showed an unending love for all people, said her best friend, Megan Bailey.

[….]

“I don’t want her remembered as the woman in the suitcase that was just thrown away,” Bailey said, “but how she loved everyone. It didn’t matter what race, what religion, she freakin’ loved you.”

McCormack’s death has spurred her friends to fight for justice. They seek answers. They want to know why their beloved friend was taken, leaving behind three young daughters. Bailey said the pain of losing McCormack is still intense.

[….]

“It’s been three months that she’s been gone,” Bailey said. “It still hurts as much as the first day. I still wake up in the morning and think, ‘Maybe I’ll get a message from Jess today.'”

McCormack Goes Missing

Her best friend knew something was wrong right away. The two, who were soul sisters, had known each other for about three years. The two had no secrets.

[….]

McCormack and her children were over at Bailey’s house on July 14. McCormack played with Bailey’s children. When Bailey didn’t hear from McCormack on July 15, she became worried. “(But) murder wasn’t my first thought. I thought she needed to get away.”

McCormack had left for a few days in June, Bailey said. She was simply tired of all the fighting with Mahamud Tooxoow Mahamed, her husband, whom Bailey refers to as “Tito.”

Bailey said the two were not married by law but through their Muslim culture.

However, Bailey said McCormack and Ibraham Akfeen, who is the father of her youngest child, had planned to make a fresh start in St. Louis.¬† [Honor killing?—ed]

[….]

Ongoing fighting and domestic disputes with Mahamed, however, colored McCormack’s world.

“She told me, ‘If I end up dead one day, Tito is going to be the reason,'” Bailey said.” She wanted to come visit. She was tired of all the fighting. It was an ongoing, everyday battle. Their relationship was very tumultuous. It was hardly ever good.”

Bailey encouraged her to break it off with Mahamed. The ups and downs of McCormack and Mahamed’s relationship took their toll.

Why didn’t she leave?

“She was scared,” Bailey said. “She wanted some sense of normalcy for her girls. She said, ‘I’m going to keep trying because there’s something good in him.'”

[….]

Charges filed

So far, charges have been filed against one man. Those charges only include kidnapping at this time.

Mahamed, 37, a Somali national, was charged in a criminal complaint filed Aug. 13 in the U.S. District Court in Springfield, Mo., according to information provided by the Justice Department. Mahamed is not in federal custody and is a fugitive from justice.

[….]

Mahamed is out of the country and was last known to be in the Mexico and Guatemala area, said McDonald County Sheriff Michael Hall. Mahamed recently posted on his Facebook account that he’s back in Somalia.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Justice Department have said they will not extradite a non-naturalized citizen, Hall said.

[….]

In September, Hall said Mahamed was a person of interest, due to the number of domestic violence calls involving the couple. In McDonald County, Mahamed also still faces two felony charges from 2017, against another woman in Noel. He is charged with one count of sodomy in the second degree and one charge of unlawful use of a weapon.

[….]

Lack of action by the Noel Marshal’s Office actually catapulted the situation into a completely different mode, Bailey said.

“The Noel Marshal’s Office did nothing,” Bailey said. “If they had been proactive, Jessica would still be here. I think they thought, ‘Jessica and Tito are fighting again.'”

Bailey said she believes Mahamed was helped by his family and his tribe.

“I think they all helped him get away.”

[….]

Her friends say that comments posted on social media tend to criticize McCormack for having multiple fathers for her three daughters. Others criticize her for being with a Somalian and being a Muslim.

[….]

“No matter what was going on in her life, she was always selfless and wanted to make sure others were OK before worrying about herself.”

Bailey said the young woman had planned to move on. The young Muslim woman, who had converted to that religion on her own accord, wanted to escape her own domestic situation.

“She was just done. She was starting to get her bearings. She was starting to ask questions about Christianity. She was trying to get her footing.”

Rest in peace Jessica.

There is more, read it all here.

This post is filed in my new category ‘Down the Memory Hole.’